How to Move Out of Your Parents’ House (With a Checklist)

How to Move Out of Your Parents’ House

If you’re living with your parents, you’re not alone. As of 2017, 31 percent of people between the ages of 25 and 35 haven’t moved out on their own yet.

And that makes sense—due to massive student loans, car payments, and humble entry-level salaries—deciding to live with the ‘rents for a few years can often be a smart choice.

However, as we all know, there comes a moment when we must leave the nest—an experience that is admittedly bittersweet. One of the hardest parts, in fact, is gaining the confidence to believe you can make it on your own.

This guide will cover the questions swirling in your mind—about leases, bills, budgeting, and items you might need—as you get started on this exciting adventure.

Hiring movers can cost way less than you might think. With clear hourly rates and trucks that you don’t have to worry about insuring or returning yourself, you can solve all your move-day needs and remove unnecessary distractions.

How Much to Save Before Moving Out

Once you move out, ideally you won’t be moving back in. That’s why it’s so important to start with the question “How much should I save before moving out?”

A good rule of thumb is three to six months of living expenses. (Note: These hypothetical expenses may differ based on the cost of living in your area.)

See below for an example of how to calculate your monthly expenses.

Monthly ExpenseDollar Amount
Rent$800
Utilities (internet, water, electricity, etc.)$100
Insurance$100
Cell phone Bill$50
Groceries$300
Gas and parking$50
Weekend Spending Money$100
Total$1500

Now, if you add a 10 percent buffer to your $1,500 (which we recommend), your monthly budget comes to $1,650. So before moving out of your parents’ house, you should consider having about $5,000 after paying the deposit on your apartment.

A common mistake people make when budgeting is underestimating how much they’ll need. For example, you may think you can manage your weekends with less than $100. But let’s be real: $100 is not much to work with—it’s just a couple meals out, a few drinks at a bar, and an Uber ride home. And that’s just one weekend!

So rather than creating a budget blindly, we recommend you look back over your old bank statements (as painful as that might be) and record how much you actually spent in the above categories. That way you’ll have a realistic idea of how much you’ll need to maintain your current lifestyle. You might also realize you’ve been spending a lot more than you thought in certain categories.

Finally, we recommend looking into some budgeting software. Sites like Mvelopes, Mint, and You Need a Budget offer easy, affordable tools for managing your money. Or, if you’re looking for a simpler option, consider using an online budget calculator and then tracking your money manually in a spreadsheet.

Things You Need When Moving Out

OK, so you know how much to save, and you’ve drafted a budget. Now it’s time to figure out the items you’ll need. We’ve put together a method for determining your essentials here. For a more detailed list, head to the bottom of this article for our complete “Moving Out of Your Parents’ House” Checklist.

The Necessities

The term “necessity” differs from person to person, so we encourage you to think about your life in five categories—cleanliness, sleep, leisure, nutrition, and exercise—and then ask yourself what you’ll need in each of these areas. For instance:

  1. What will I need to keep myself and my environment clean?
  2. What will I need to get a great night’s sleep?
  3. What will I need to stay entertained and grow as a human being when I’m not at work?
  4. What will I need to prepare my meals?
  5. What will I need to stay fit and healthy?

When you think in these five categories, it will become much easier to determine what is essential and what is not.

However, regardless of your taste and lifestyle, some things like toilet paper, a trash can, trash bags, cups, forks, and knives, are always essential. You can find more of these types of items in our checklist.

How to Move Out of Your Parent’s House: The Checklist

  Bed with comforter/sheets

Trash cans

Trash bags

Cleaning supplies and sponges

Food and water

Shower curtain

Area rug (optional)

Small table

Lamps

TV and TV stand (optional)

Silverware

Dishes

Pots & Pans

Other kitchenware: can opener, bottle opener, colander, et cetera.

Bathroom supplies: toilet paper, plunger, bath towels

Sofa

Blinds and curtains

Ironing board and steamer

Microwave

First-aid kit

Tools

Laundry hamper, detergent, and dryer sheets

Furniture: desk, chair, and dresser

Last, but not least, consider hiring movers 

Check off that last item on your checklist in just minutes. A free online estimate is only a few clicks away.

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